Wearing glasses adults (easy read)

Easy read fact sheet on wearing glasses for adults.

This is an easy read document

Glasses can help you see clearly

Someone wearing glasses

Everybody’s sight without glasses gets worse as they get older.

Someone wearing glasses

Most people need to wear glasses at some time in their life.

An optician

The person who tests your eyes is called an optometrist. We will call them an optician in this factsheet.

A calendar

You should have an eye test at an optician’s at least every 2 years.

Why you might need to wear glasses

A phone

You might need glasses to see things close to you:

Using your phone.

Food

Eating.

A laptop

Using a computer.

A television

You might need glasses to see things further away:

Watching TV.

Theatre

Watching a show or film.

A wheelchair user

Going out.

Wearing the right glasses will help you see clearly

Deciding

You can go to any optician to choose your glasses. You need to take your prescription with you.

A prescription

Your optician will tell you why you need glasses.

They will give you a prescription which tells you and others about the glasses you need.

A form

We have a form called – ‘Feedback from my optometrist’.

You can ask the optician to fill this form in. It will explain why you need glasses.
Go to www.seeability.org/feedback-optom to get the form.

Different colour glasses

You may need 2 pairs of glasses.

One pair for seeing things close to you.
One pair for seeing things further away.

Glasses

Some people need glasses with special lenses.

Bifocals or varifocals are glasses that have special lenses.
The lenses will help you see further away and close to you.

Sunglasses

You can get glasses that help you see clearly that are also sunglasses.

Sun

Some glasses have lenses that go dark when the sun is out.

Choosing glasses

There are lots of frames that are very strong or very thin or flexible. These frames might fit your face better.
The optician will help you choose the right glasses.

A conversation

It is important to wear your glasses.

Tell people who support you about your eyesight.

Health plan

They need to know what you wear glasses for.
Write why you wear glasses in your health action plan or support plan.

Trying on glasses

It can take time to get used to your glasses.

You may need to practice wearing them.
People may need to support you to wear them until you are used to them.

Cleaning glasses

Keep your glasses clean.

You can clean your glasses gently with the cloth in your glasses case.
Your supporter can help you keep your glasses clean.

If your glasses get very dirty

Soap

Wash them carefully in warm, soapy water.
Then dry them with a glasses cloth.

Glasses with a strap

If you want, you can have a strap for your glasses.

Some people have a strap on their glasses.
This stops their glasses falling off, getting lost or damaged.

Glasses case

Use your glasses case.

When you take your glasses off keep them safe in your glasses case so they don’t get scratched or broken.

Glasses

Have your name on your glasses.

You can ask you optician if you can have your name put on the glasses frame.

Fitted glasses

Tell your optician if your glasses don’t fit, are broken or uncomfortable.

Ill fitting glasses

Your glasses can become loose, slip down your nose, or even fall off your face.

Fixing glasses

You can take your glasses to an optician if they are uncomfortable or if you need to get them fixed.
They often do small repairs for free.

Blurry vision

Your eyesight can change.

If you find it harder to see well with your glasses your eyesight may have changed.

An eye test

It is important to book a new eye test. It might be time to get new glasses.

Ideas to help you remember what to use your glasses for

Different colour glasses

You could have different colour glasses.

Glasses case

You could have different colour glasses cases.

Computer sticker

You could use stickers on the case to show what activities they are for.

A factsheet

For more easy read information about eye care and glasses, go to:
www.seeability.org/looking-after-your-eyes